1st PUC English Textbook Answers Reflections Chapter 4 Oru Manushyan

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Karnataka 1st PUC English Textbook Answers Reflections Chapter 4 Oru Manushyan

Oru Manushyan Questions and Answers, Notes, Summary

Oru Manushyan Comprehension I

Question 1.
How far was the big city from the narrator’s home-town?
Answer:
Around a thousand five hundred miles.

Question 2.
Where did the narrator stay in the big city?
Answer:
In a very small, dingy room.

Question 3.
For the money, people would do anything, even ______ (Fill in the blank)
Answer:
commit murder.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 4.
What was the narrator doing to earn a living?
OR
How did the narrator earn his living in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
OR
What did the narrator teach the migrant labourers in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
He taught English to some migrant labourers.

Question 5.
______ was considered a great education there.
(a) Learning English
(b) Learning to write an address in English
(c) Writing addresses at the post-office.
Answer:
(b) Learning to write an address in English.

Question 6.
What reason did the narrator give for sleeping all day and having food in the evening?
OR
Why did the narrator have food only in the evening?
Answer:
So that he could save the expense of drinking his morning tea and eating the noon meal.

Question 7.
How much money did the narrator have in his pocket as his life’s savings?
OR
What was the narrator’s life’s savings?
Answer:
Fourteen Rupees.

Question 8.
The man who came forward to pay the narrator’s bill was
(a) a man with a red turban.
(b) a person dressed in a suit.
(c) a money lender.
Answer:
(a) A man with a red turban.

Oru Manushyan Comprehension II

Question 1.
Describe the people and the place where the incident took place.
OR
What does the narrator say about the people of the city where he lived?
OR
Describe the people and the place where the narrator stayed.
Answer:
The place was quite a big city in the valley of a mountain. The inhabitants did not have the virtue of mercy in their heart and were a cruel lot. They were ready to do anything for money. Shocking incidents like murder, robbery, pickpocketing were the order of the day. The inhabitants worked as soldiers, money lenders and watchmen in banks/mills/commercial establishments. They had no knowledge of English and it was as though they were content in their own small world of malice and meanness.

Question 2.
What was the routine of the narrator in the city?
Answer:
There was nothing exciting about the routine of the narrator in the city. He taught the migrant labourers English as they wanted to write addresses in English at the post office. As they were working people, he could teach them only in the evening. Usually, his teaching went on from nine-thirty till eleven in the night. Since he earned very little, he slept the whole day and woke up at four in the evening so as to avoid the expenses of morning tea and noon lunch.

Question 3.
Give an account of the embarrassing experience of the narrator at the restaurant.
Answer:
One evening the narrator goes to a crowded restaurant to have his food and when he has to pay the bill of eleven annas, he realises that his purse with his life’s savings of fourteen rupees is missing. But, the owner of the restaurant thinks that the speaker is trying to cheat him, and threatens to gouge his eyes out. None of the others at the restaurant seem to have any kindness either. The speaker pleads with the owner to keep his coat as surety. But, the owner guffaws and makes the speaker remove his coat, shirt, and shoes.

KSEEB Solutions

When he wants the speaker to remove even the trousers, the speaker pleads with him for mercy saying he has nothing inside. This only invokes more laughter and the restaurant owner, along with fifty other people gathered there, forces the speaker to strip further saying mockingly, “There must be something inside.” The speaker, now resigned to his fate, starts unbuttoning his trousers, all the time imagining himself standing naked in front of others, with his eyes gouged out.

We see that the narrator is not only embarrassed but also humiliated. Since he is not a cheat, it must have been terribly embarrassing for him to have realised that he had eaten his food at the restaurant, but had no money to pay for the food. His embarrassment would have increased when the owner of the restaurant treated him as a cheat. But, to top it all, the cruel way in which not only the owner but also the people gathered there treated him would have been humiliating for the narrator.

Question 4.
A stranger saved the day for the narrator. How?
OR
How did the stranger come to the help of the narrator?
OR
How does the stranger rescue the narrator in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
When the narrator is at the point of removing his trousers though he has nothing inside, a blue-eyed,’ fair-complexioned six-footer, with a red turban and white trousers, intervenes and offers to pay the amount due from the narrator to the restaurant owner. He asks the speaker to go with him and when the grateful speaker asks for his name, he says he has no name. When the speaker says ‘Mercy’ must be his name, he does not react and walks on until they reach a deserted bridge.

There, after making sure that no one is around, the stranger takes out five wallets and asks the speaker which of these is his. He warns the speaker to go away without turning around and adds that the speaker should not admit to anyone that he has seen the man. He gives the wallet, which has been identified by the speaker, with the money intact and leaves the place wishing the speaker that he be helped by God. The speaker, on his part, hopes that God would help the stranger.

Thus we see that the pickpocket helps the narrator not only at the restaurant but also outside by returning the purse. This is how the act of kindness gains insignificance. First of all the pickpocket is good enough to help the man who faces humiliation as he has lost his purse; secondly, he is kind enough to return the purse; thirdly, the eleven annas that he pays is not the narrator’s money, but his own.

Oru Manushyan Comprehension III

Question 1.
Does the story ‘Oru Manushyan’ talk about transformation in a person/man? Discuss.
OR
‘Oru Manushyan’ exemplifies the transformation of a human being. Substantiate.
Answer:
Yes, indeed. The transformation is seen in the pick-pocket. The pickpocket not only helps the narrator at the restaurant but also helps him further by returning the purse. This is how the act of kindness gains in significance. First of all the pickpocket is good enough to help the man who faces humiliation as he has lost his purse; secondly, he is kind enough to return the purse; thirdly, the twelve annas that he pays is not the narrator’s money, but his own. Perhaps the pickpocket, until then, was not a witness to the problems created for people from whom he had stolen their purse. Maybe the narrator’s plight reveals to him for the first time glimpses of the problems faced by people when they lose their purse, with their hard-earned money in it. That is why, despite the fact that people at that place were usually merciless, we see a transformation taking place in the heart of the pick-pocket.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 2.
Do you think the restaurant keeper was over-reacting when the narrator could not pay the bill? If so, what accounts for his behaviour?
Answer:
Yes, he was. He gives the narrator no chance at all. It is as if all those who claimed to have lost their purse were liars. Even when the narrator asks him to keep his coat, he shows no leniency. He has a lot of sadistic pleasure at the cost of the narrator while forcing him to strip. He comes out as a cruel man who has no pity at all for people with problems.

However, there is the possibility that he has turned out to be so cruel after bitter experiences. If we consider the fact that the people of that place were ready to do anything for money, we should understand that the restaurant owner might have had people duping him with a cock-and-bull story of losing the purse. Maybe over the years, he has lost his gentleness and hence goes to the extreme extent of ill-treating such people so that others wouldn’t dare come up with lies.

All said and done, the final word on the restaurant owner is that he comes out as merciless. He could have made the narrator do some work in his restaurant to make up for the eleven annas. But, he gives absolutely no chance to the narrator and humiliates him cruelly.

Oru Manushyan Additional Questions and Answers

I. Answer the following questions in a word, a phrase or a sentence each:

Question 1.
How much did the meal at the restaurant cost?
Answer:
The meal along with tea cost eleven annas.

Question 2.
What did the narrator name ‘the man’ who returned his wallet?
OR
What name did the narrator give the stranger in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
OR
What did the narrator call the man who paid the bill in the restaurant ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
Mercy.

Question 3.
What was the amount paid to the people for writing postal addresses?
Answer:
Anything between one anna and four annas.

Question 4.
What was the traditional occupation of the people in the big city?
Answer:
Professional soldiers.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 5.
For what quality were the inhabitants of the city never known?
OR
Which quality is unknown to the inhabitants of the big city in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
Quality of mercy.

Question 6.
What did the people of the city value highly?
Answer:
Money.

Question 7.
Why did the narrator sleep all day in the city?
Answer:
To save the expenses of drinking the morning tea or eating the noon meal.

Question 8.
When did the narrator wake up every day?
Answer:
At four in the evening.

Question 9.
How much money did the narrator have in his wallet?
OR
How much did the narrator have in his wallet when he went to the restaurant in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
Fourteen rupees.

Question 10.
How many wallets did the thief have in his pockets?
Answer:
About five wallets.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 11.
Why couldn’t the narrator pay the bill in the restaurant?
Answer:
The narrator couldn’t pay the bill as somebody had picked his pocket and taken away his wallet.

Question 12.
How much was the bill of the narrator in the restaurant?
Answer:
Eleven annas.

Question 13.
Whom did the narrator teach English in ‘Oru Manushyan’?
Answer:
The narrator taught English to some migrant labourers.

Question 14.
What did the narrator eat in the restaurant?
Answer:
A full meal consisting of chapattis and meat curry. He drank tea as well.

Question 15.
Who had stolen the narrator’s wallet?
Answer:
A man with a red turban and white trousers.

Question 16.
Who saved the narrator by paying his bill?
Answer:
A man with a red turban and white trousers who was actually the one who had picked the narrator’s pocket saved the narrator by paying his bill.

Question 17.
The people in the city were not known for the quality of ______. (Fill in the blank)
Answer:
mercy.

Question 18.
The people of the city were _______
(a) honest
(b) cruel
(c) obedient.
Answer:
(b) cruel.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 19.
By tradition, the people of the city were ______
(a) soldiers
(b) beggars
(c) teachers
Answer:
(a) soldiers.

Question 20.
Where would many people serve as watchmen in the big city?
Answer:
Many people in the big city served as watchmen in banks, malls, and large commercial establishments.

Question 21.
What were the daily occurrences in the city?
Answer:
Murder, robbery, pick-pocketing (picking pockets) were the daily occurrences in the city.

Question 22.
How did people earn money in the city?
Answer:
The people in the city were professional soldiers by tradition. Some of them went to distant places and lent out money on interest. Many others served as watchmen in banks, malls, and large commercial establishments in big cities.

Question 23.
For the money, people would do anything, even commit ____. (Fill in the blank)
OR
In ‘Oru Manushyan’, the people in the city would do anything, even ____ for the sake of money.
(a) commit murder
(b) rob banks
(c) beg on the streets.
Answer:
murder.

Question 24.
When did the narrator teach English to migrant labourers?
Answer:
The narrator taught English to migrant labourers from nine-thirty till eleven in the night.

Question 25.
_______ was considered a great education in the city.
(a) Learning English
(b) Teaching English
(c) Learning to write an address in English.
Answer:
(c) Learning to write an address in English.

Question 26.
People paid ______ to write an address in English at the post office.
(a) eleven annas
(b) four annas
(c) fourteen rupees.
Answer:
(b) four annas.

Question 27.
In ‘Oru Manushyan’, the narrator put his hands into his pocket and found that his
(a) a wallet was not there
(b) wallet was there
(c) a pocket was torn.
Answer:
(a) a wallet was not there.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 28.
What was the threat of the owner of the restaurant to the narrator if the money was not paid?
Answer:
The owner of the restaurant threatened to gouge his eyes out if the money was not paid.

Question 29.
The people in the restaurant looked like hungry ______
(a) wolves
(b) tigers
(c) lions
Answer:
(a) wolves.

Question 30.
The narrator was not ready to take off his ______
(a) coat
(b) shirt
(c) trousers.
Answer:
(c) trousers.

Question 31.
Why was the narrator not ready to take off his trousers?
Answer:
The narrator Was not ready to take off his trousers because he had nothing on underneath.

Question 32.
The man who came forward to pay the narrator’s bill was
(a) a man with a red turban
(b) a man dressed in a suit
(c) a money lender.
Answer:
(a) a man with a red turban.

Question 33.
Where did the man with the red turban take the narrator?
Answer:
The man with the red turban took the narrator to a deserted bridge.

II. Answer the following questions in 80 – 100 words each:

Question 1.
How did the restaurant owner treat the narrator?
OR
What was the reaction of the owner of the restaurant when the narrator was unable to pay the bill?
Answer:
There is no doubt that the restaurant owner treats the narrator mercilessly. He gives the narrator no chance at all. It is as if all those who claimed to have lost their purse were liars. Even when the narrator asks him to keep his coat, he shows no leniency. He has a lot of sadistic pleasure at the cost of the narrator while forcing him to strip. He comes out as a cruel man who has no pity at all for people with problems. However, there is the possibility that he has turned out to be so cruel after bitter experiences of being cheated by people who ate at the restaurant and pretended to have lost their purse.

If we consider the fact that the people of that place were ready to do anything for money, we should understand that the restaurant owner might have had people duping him with a cock-and-bull story of losing their purse. Maybe over the years, he has lost his gentleness and hence goes to the extreme extent of ill-treating such people so that others wouldn’t dare come up with lies.

All said and done, the final word on the restaurant owner is that he comes out as merciless. He could have made the narrator do some work in his restaurant to make up for the eleven annas. But, he gives absolutely no chance to the narrator and humiliates him cruelly.

Question 2.
What was the narrator’s profession? What kind of people lived in the city?
Answer:
The narrator was an English teacher by profession. He taught migrant labourers to write addresses in English from nine-thirty till eleven in the night. He lived in quite a big city in the valley of a mountain some thousand five hundred miles from home. The people of the city had never been known for the quality of mercy. They were cruel people who committed murder, robbery and picking pockets every day. But, by tradition, they were professional soldiers. Some of them lent out money on interest and many others served as watchmen in banks, mills and large commercial establishments in big cities.

KSEEB Solutions

Question 3.
How did the narrator lose his wallet? How did he finally pay the bill?
OR
Who had picked the narrator’s wallet? How was he saved by a stranger?
Answer:
One day, the narrator stepped out for his tea and a meal. He was dressed in a suit and he had a wallet in his coat pocket in which he had kept fourteen rupees. He went into a crowded restaurant and ate a full meal. The meal and tea cost him eleven annas. When he put his hand in his coat pocket to pay, there was no wallet in his coat pocket. When he told the restaurant owner that someone had picked his pocket and had taken away his wallet, the owner thought that he was telling lies. He threatened to gouge his eyes out if the bill was not paid. Then the narrator told the restaurant owner to keep his coat in the restaurant and that he would go out and bring some money.

The restaurant owner did not trust him and forced him to remove his coat, shirt and shoes off. Finally, he asked him to take off his trousers. The narrator told him that he had nothing underneath and expressed his reluctance to take off his trousers. But nobody in the restaurant believed him. As he had no other alternative, he began to undo the buttons of his trousers. At that moment a stranger announced that he would pay the money. He was a six-foot-tall, fair-complexioned man wearing a red turban and white trousers. He paid eleven annas to the restaurant owner and asked the narrator to follow him. Soon after reaching a deserted bridge, he took out five wallets from his pocket and asked the narrator to choose his from them. When the narrator pointed towards his wallet, the stranger asked him to open it. The narrator found his money intact and put it in his pocket. Thus the narrator realized that his wallet had been stolen by the stranger.

III. Answer the following questions in 200 words each:

Question 1.
“I have some vague notions about human beings”, says the narrator in ‘Oru Manushyan’. Do you agree with him? Elaborate.
Answer:
‘Oru Manushyan’ is a short story by V.M. Basheer. The narrator-speaker is the main protagonist, who narrates the predicament of a stranger in an alien city and how a total stranger rescued him from an embarrassing situation. The narrator, before narrating a personal incident, tells the reader, “I have some vague notions about human beings”, and he includes himself also in that category. Next, he remarks that among the people around us there are good men as well as thieves and also those who suffer from various infectious diseases and from madness. This being a fact, one has to live carefully whilst living amidst such a class of people. He also opines that the world has more evil than good and generally we come to realize this only after getting hurt. The narrator then recounts an incident which would have devastated his life completely, if only a stranger who was also a thief had not come to his rescue out of sheer humanitarian concerns.

The narrator once stayed in a big city in the valley of a mountain and made his living teaching English to migrant labourers. Thus the narrator earned his daily bread as an English teacher. He used to keep his savings in a wallet in his coat pocket. One evening he had a full meal in a crowded restaurant. But, when he went to the counter and put his hand in his coat pocket to pay the bill, his wallet was not there. He started sweating profusely and told the owner that his pocket had been picked. The owner caught him by the lapels of his coat and threatened to gouge his eyes out. The narrator confesses that when he looked around him nobody appeared to sympathise with him and had the look of hungry wolves.

The narrator told the owner that he would leave his coat there and go out, bring some money and take his coat back. But the owner laughed contemptuously and got him to take off his clothes and then his shoes suspecting that he was hiding the money somewhere and was telling a lie. Next, the owner asked him to take off his trousers but the narrator told him that he was not wearing anything underneath. Everyone around him laughed. Having no other alternative, he slowly began to undo the buttons of his trousers. Then suddenly he heard someone asking him to stop removing his trousers and offering to pay his bill.

KSEEB Solutions

The narrator saw a fair-complexioned man, six-foot-tall, with red turban and white trousers. He came forward and paid money to the owner; then he asked the narrator to put on his clothes and follow him. When the narrator expressed his gratitude he just laughed and enquired his name. When the narrator asked his name the stranger replied that he had no name to which the narrator responded saying that his name must be ‘Mercy’. After they had come to a deserted bridge, the narrator took out five wallets from his pocket and asked the narrator to choose his wallet from among them. The narrator chose his wallet and found his money intact. The stranger asked him to leave and wished that God would help him. The narrator also said the same thing and both of them left the place.

After listening to the narrator’s story, I would like to certainly agree with the narrator. Our notions about people are really vague and in real life, people do not behave as they appear to be. Appearances are certainly deceptive. We generally tend to believe that there are two clearly demarcated categories of people – good people and bad people. But, after reading this story, I realize that we ought not to judge people based on what we see on the surface. Our judgements may not be true. In this story, the narrator tells us that, those people whom he thought were cruel and were engaged in crimes of all kinds worked as watchmen in banks, mills and large commercial establishments in big cities. He also had come to the conclusion that such people would even commit murder for the sake of money.

But the story he tells us shows how illogical and irrational we can be in our inferences and judgements. As it happens in the story, all the people believed to be virtuous, kind and good by nature were supposed to be living a normal life and hence were the ones sitting around the narrator in the crowded restaurant. But it was shocking to see their reactions when the narrator told the owner that he had lost his purse and had no money to pay. As believed by the narrator if they were good people they should have come to his rescue and should have offered to pay or request the owner to let the narrator go out and bring some money. But they belied the narrator’s opinion and did not come to his help. On the contrary, they also had wolfish looks in their eyes and joined hands with the owner in making fun of the narrator.

On the other hand, it was the thief who had stolen the wallet, who came to the rescue of the narrator. Though he stood at a distance and watched the whole drama, he was not by nature cruel and was quite human. He understood the predicament of the victim and rescued him. He also returned the narrator’s wallet. He proved himself to be the only human being amongst human-looking wolves. That is why the writer has titled his story quite appropriately calling it ‘Oru Manushyan’.

Oru Manushyan Vocabulary

Synonyms and Antonyms
A synonym is a word which is identical in sense and usage with another, for example, ‘fast’ is a synonym of ‘quick’. An antonym is a word which is of contrary meaning to another- ‘hot’ is an antonym of ‘cold’.

Question 1.
Work in pairs and find the synonym to the words given below. Refer to a Thesaurus if necessary.
1st PUC English Textbook Answers Reflections Chapter 4 Oru Manushyan 1
Answer:
1st PUC English Textbook Answers Reflections Chapter 4 Oru Manushyan 2

Choose the word that is opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters.

Question 1.
Up
A. down
B.above
C. inside
Answer:
A. down

Question 2.
Give
A. share
B. take
C. release
Answer:
B. take

KSEEB Solutions

Question 3.
Large
A. huge
B. big
C. small
Answer:
C. small

Question 4.
Happy
A. glad
B. sad
C. calm
Answer:
B. sad

Question 5.
Thin
A. short
B. thick
C. skinny
Answer:
B. thick

Question 6.
Buy
A. sell
B. have
C. hold
Answer:
A. sell

Question 7.
Tight
A. free
B. loose
C. firm
Answer:
B. loose

Question 8.
Cruel
A. bad
B. nice
C. kind
Answer:
C. kind

KSEEB Solutions

Use suitable prefixes to form antonyms.
(il, dis, un, im, mis, in)
Ex. Climax – anticlimax.

Question 1.

  1. Healthy – ______
  2. Mobile – ______
  3. Please – ______
  4. Prove – ________
  5. Logical –
  6. Conception – _______
  7. Orthodox – ______
  8. Sane – _______
  9. Perfect – _______

Answer:

  1. Healthy – unhealthy
  2. Mobile – immobile
  3. Please – displease
  4. Prove – disprove
  5. Logical – illogical
  6. Conception – misconception
  7. Orthodox – unorthodox
  8. Sane – insane
  9. Perfect – imperfect.

Question 2.
Provide antonyms for the following words from the lesson. Avoid using affixes.
rescue, remember, vague, madness, inhabitant, distant, lend, dirty, expensive, crowded, quiet, forward, laugh, open.
Answer:

  • Rescue × abandon
  • Remember × forget
  • Vague × clear, definite
  • Madness × sanity
  • Inhabitant × foreigner
  • Distant × near
  • Lend × borrow
  • Dirty × clean
  • Expensive × cheap
  • Crowded × empty
  • Quiet × noisy
  • Forward × backward
  • Laugh × cry
  • Open × close

Oru Manushyan by Vaikom Muhammad Basheer A Note on the Author:

Vaikom Muhammad Basheer (1908-1994) is a well-known Malayalam short story writer and novelist. He is known for his sympathetic portrayal of the joys and sorrows of ordinary life. His stories have been translated into English and various Indian languages. He was an honorary fellow of the Sahitya Akademi in 1970. He was the recipient of the Central Sahitya Akademi Award and Padmashri in 1982.

Oru Manushyan Summary in English

‘Oru Manushyan’ when translated to English means ‘A Man’ and the title refers to a man who comes to the rescue of the speaker, who is in a land which is one thousand five hundred miles away from his home. The speaker knows no one there; neither does he know the local language. He knows English and Hindustani, but not many inhabitants of the land understand English or Hindustani. The place is quite a big city in the valley of a mountain. The crime rate is high as the people are merciless and are prepared to do anything for money. They work as soldiers, money lenders and watchmen in banks/mills/commercial establishments.

The speaker, who stays in a small room, teaches English to migrant labourers from nine-thirty till eleven in the night as people want to learn English to write addresses in English at the post office. If they have to get it done by others, they have to pay anything between one anna and four annas. The speaker, who earns very little, sleeps all day and wakes up at four in the evening so as to avoid the expenses of morning tea and noon lunch.

Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada 1

One evening he goes to a crowded restaurant to have his food and when he has to pay the bill of eleven annas, he realises that his purse with his life’s savings of fourteen rupees is missing. But, the owner of the restaurant thinks that the speaker is trying to cheat him, and threatens to gouge his eyes out. None of the others at the restaurant seem to have any kindness either. The speaker pleads with the owner to keep his coat as surety. But, the owner guffaws and makes the speaker remove his coat, shirt, and shoes. When he wants the speaker to remove even the trousers, the speaker pleads with him for mercy saying he has nothing inside. This only invokes more laughter and the restaurant owner, along with fifty other people gathered there, forces the speaker to strip further, and says mockingly, “There must be something inside.”

The speaker, now resigned to his fate, starts unbuttoning his trousers, all the time imagining himself standing naked in front of others, with his eyes gouged out. It is at this point that a blue-eyed, fair-complexioned, a six-footer with a red turban and white trousers intervenes and offers to pay the amount due, to the owner. He asks the speaker to go with him and when the grateful speaker asks for his name, he says he has no name. When the speaker says ‘Mercy’ must be his name, he does not react and walks on until they reach a deserted bridge. There, after making sure that no one is around, the stranger takes out five wallets and asks the speaker which of these is his. He warns the speaker to go away without turning around and adds that the speaker should not admit to anyone that he has seen the man. He gives the wallet, which has been identified by the speaker as his own, with the money intact, and leaves the place wishing the speaker that he be helped by God. The speaker, on his part, hopes that God would help the stranger.

KSEEB Solutions

It is clear that the man, who helps the speaker, in reality, is the pick-pocket who has stolen the purse of the speaker, in addition to four other wallets. Though the speaker is more than grateful to the man, the situation raises many ethical questions. Do we take the pick-pocket as a man with a kind heart? Following one line of argument, we can say that he definitely is. Otherwise, he wouldn’t have helped the speaker. Had he been totally hard-hearted, he would have probably had a lot of fun, watching the humiliation of the speaker, knowing full well that the speaker is telling the truth. One more point that goes in his favour is the truth that the money he pays at the restaurant is not from the fourteen rupees of the speaker. In fact, he asks the speaker to count his money and make sure that the amount is not touched.

But, this doesn’t absolve him of wrongdoing. What would have happened to the speaker if the man who had picked his pocket wasn’t around? What about the plight of the other four people who have lost their wallets? Isn’t there the possibility that they too would probably be in similar or even worse situations? There is also the question of the background of the thief. Has he indulged in the crime because of some unavoidable circumstances or is it that he is a man who wants to earn some quick money? The various ethical questions point in one direction – we cannot sit in judgment of the actions of others. No case can be judged from a single point of view. There are multiple possibilities. However, it is evident that, though a criminal, the man – ‘Oru Manushyan’ – is certainly a person with some goodness in his heart and the speaker would always remember him as his kind saviour.

Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada

Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada 2
Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada 3
Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada 4
Oru Manushyan Summary in Kannada 5

Glossary:

  • oru manushyan: a human being
  • predicament (n): an unpleasant dangerous situation
  • to befall (v): to happen
  • dingy (adj): dirty looking, dull
  • migrant (n): a worker who moves from place to place to do seasonal work
  • chores (n): minor work at home
  • wallet (n): purse
  • gouge out: to cut or force something out roughly or brutally
  • guffaw (n): a loud laugh
  • stark naked (adj): completely naked
  • to save the day (idiom): to prevent failure or defeat

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