KSEEB Solutions for Class 9 English Poem Chapter 9 Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S.

Students can Download English Poem 9 Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. Questions and Answers, Summary, Notes Pdf, KSEEB Solutions for Class 9 English Karnataka State Board Solutions help you to revise complete Syllabus and score more marks in your examinations.

Karnataka State Board Class 9 English Poem Chapter 9 Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S.

Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. Questions and Answers, Summary, Notes

Comprehension:

C1. Answer the following questions:

Question 1.
What do you think is the ‘occasion’ for the poem?
Answer:
The occasion for the poem is a send-off party to Miss Pushpa T.S. who is going abroad.

Question 2.
What impression do you get about Miss Pushpa after reading the poem? OR What kind of person do you think Miss Pushpa is?
Answer:
Whatever we learn about Pushpa is from the references made by the speaker about Pushpa. So, we cannot conclude that in reality,

Miss Pushpa is what she is projected to be. Secondly, we should also remember that the occasion is the goodbye party for Miss. Pushpa. Hence, naturally, only good things will be said about her irrespective of what she in reality is.

From the narration of the speaker, we realize that Miss Pushpa is from a well-to-do family. She is well known for her external and internal beauty. She is a cheerful, pleasant looking, hard-working and popular person among people.

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Question 3.
Write in two or three sentences about Miss Pushpa’s family.
Answer:
Miss Pushpa is described as belonging to a ‘high family’. However, the speaker cannot remember whether her father, a famous advocate, is in Bulsar or Surat.

Question 4.
Pick out the lines from the poem which reveal or indicate that Miss Pushpa was liked by all.
Answer:
“You are all-knowing, friends, what sweetness is in Miss Pushpa.”
“She is a most popular lady with men also and ladies also” reveal that Miss Pushpa was liked by all.

Question 5.
What traits of Miss Pushpa does the poet appreciate?
Answer:
The poet appreciates Miss Pushpa for her cheerfulness. He says that she is a sweet person both externally as well as at heart. Though she belongs to a well-to-do family, she does not have any arrogance but is popular among not only her female colleagues but also male colleagues. She readily takes up any work given to her and completes it in time without grumbling or refusing. All these traits of Miss Pushpa are worth appreciation.

Question 6.
How would you consider the poem – A farewell address or a welcome speech? Justify your answer.
Answer:
The poem is a farewell address as all have assembled there to bid bon voyage to Miss Pushpa who is going abroad to improve her career prospects. The speaker and the audience are quite knowledgeable about her character and aptitude which reveals that they know her very well. This is not possible when a person is just entering a company as an employee. There is also a mention in the poem twice that they have met that day to wish her bon voyage.

Question 7.
There are a few ‘expressions’ in the poem which are typically Indian. Identify these expressions.
Answer:
The whole poem is a satire on the way most of the Indians speak English. Hence, there are plenty of examples of Indian usages. The usage of present continuous tense is typically Indian. The expressions in the poem which are typically Indian are:

  1. Departing for foreign
  2. You are all-knowing
  3. Smiling and smiling
  4. Very high family
  5. once only I stayed in Surat
  6. with men also and ladies also
  7. just now only I will do it
  8. that is showing good spirit

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Question 8.
Would you consider Miss Pushpa as a handsome person? Justify your answer.
Answer:
Miss Pushpa is a good looking person because the speaker mentions that not only is she a good looking person but also a beautiful person by heart.

Question 9.
Would you consider this poem as making gentle fun of the people who cannot speak English properly? Justify your answer.
Answer:
Certainly, the poem makes gentle fun of the people who cannot speak English properly. Hence, the poem can be considered a satire. However, the intention of the satire is not to make fun, but to correct. The poet shows how Indians have Indianised the English language. Since English is not our native language, it is all right for us to speak it in a manner that is different from the manner of native speakers of English.

However, not all Indians speak English in this manner. There are quite a few Indians who can speak the language in a chaste manner. Perhaps the poet should have taken enough trouble to point out this fact.

C2. Imagine you are Miss Pushpa. Prepare a thanksgiving speech in response to the speech in the poem.

Since Miss Pushpa is all set to go abroad, we can conclude that her language is different from the language of the speaker. So her speech would probably be the following:

My dear colleagues,

As all of us know, parting is painful. Though I’m going abroad for better prospects, there will always be a void in my heart as I have to say goodbye to you. This emptiness cannot be filled by the people I would be meeting in my new workplace. This I say very earnestly as each of you ensured that my time here was happy and tension-free.

You, my dear friends, will always be a part of my life. But, in life we need to move on; and so, I’ve moved on. I thank you wholeheartedly for organizing this farewell party for me. I thank Mr. Ezekiel for his words of appreciation which came straight from his heart. Before I put the mike down, let me hope that we will meet someday, somewhere.

Thank you.

C3. Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow:

1. Surat? Ah, yes once only I stayed in Surat.

Question a.
Who does T refer to here?
Answer:
Here, T refers to Pushpa’s colleague.

Question b.
Why is the reference to Surat made here?
Answer:
Miss Pushpa’s father was a renowned advocate from a very high family in Bulsar or Surat. While referring to this point, the speaker also remembers that once he stayed in Surat with the family members of his uncle’s family.

Question c.
Is this remark apt in the context?
Answer:
No, it is not contextual. The speaker satirizes the Indian habit of meandering while narrating a particular incident.

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2. “Just now only I will do it”

Question a.
Who does T refer to here?
Answer:
Here, T refers to Miss Pushpa.

Question b.
What does “if mean here?
Answer:
‘It’ means any task given to Miss Pushpa for completion.

Question c.
What does this show of the T referred to?
Answer:
It shows Miss Pushpa’s dedication to her work. She did any task given to her quickly and cheerfully. She never asked why the work was given to her. Neither did she procrastinate.

C4. Here are a few phrases/lines from the poem. Correct the mistakes wherever necessary and rewrite them.

KSEEB Solutions for Class 9 English Poem Chapter 9 Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. 1
Answer:
KSEEB Solutions for Class 9 English Poem Chapter 9 Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. 2

Multiple Choice Questions:

Question 1.
The poem is …………… to Miss Pushpa T.S.
A) a welcome speech
B) a farewell address
C) a lesson in English
D) none of the above.
Answer:
B) a farewell address

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Question 2.
‘Is departing for foreign’ this line means
A) is leaving for a foreign country
B) is going to die
C) is coming from a foreign country
D) is living in a foreign country.
Answer:
A) is leaving for a foreign country

Question 3.
The poem is described as …………….. Indian English.
A) an attempt to ridicule
B) a satire on
C) a criticism of
D) comment on.
Answer:
B) a satire on

Question 4.
Miss Pushpa was going to
A) another city
B) a different office
C) a foreign country
D) give up her job.
Answer:
C) a foreign country

Question 5.
They have gathered to wish her
A) a happy birthday
B) for her wedding anniversary
C) for her achievement
D) bon voyage.
Answer:
D) bon voyage.

Question 6.
Miss Pushpa is smiling and smiling because
A) it is a humorous occasion
B) she is feeling happy
C) somebody cut a joke
D) Whenever she is free
Answer:
A) it is a humorous occasion

Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. by Nissim Ezekiel About The Poet:

Nissim Ezekiel (1924-2004) is a well known Indo-Anglican poet. He has a number of poems to his credit. He lived in Mumbai for a long time and joined the prestigious ‘Illustrated Weekly of India’ in 1953. He worked there for two years. Later he produced several volumes of verse and plays. He was also an art critic. The present poem is taken from his ‘Collected Poems’.

Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S. Summary in English

The poem ‘Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S.’ is a monologue. A monologue is a poem in which we find a single speaker, though we feel the presence of other listeners. At the beginning of the poem, the speaker explains that Miss Pushpa is going to a different country and states that she’s a sweet person. He explains that the woman comes from a well-to-do family.

However, he gets sidetracked with his own memories. After digressing, the speaker states that Miss Pushpa is a popular person who is kind and always willing to help others. At the end of the.poem, the speaker asks the others at the party to give their own speeches about the party’s honoree.

The main theme of ‘Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S.’ isn’t the loss of a friend; instead, it is human foibles or character faults. This is a popular theme among Ezekiel’s works. The poem offers a satirical look at how some people in India speak English, a device that the poet presumably used to get an Indian reader to laugh at himself. The poem misuses the present continuous tense and uses phrases and syntax found in the Indian language.

For example, when Ezekiel writes, “Whatever I or anybody is asking/ She is always saying yes.” The poem also satirizes the Indian habit of digressing from the topic by showing that in between his speech, the speaker unnecessarily speaks about his visit to Surat.

Ezekiel wrote many of his works, including ‘Goodbye Party for Miss Pushpa T.S.’ in the dialect of urban Indians, particularly those in Bombay. This dialect is called “Babu English.” Originally, the colonial British used the word “babu” as a derogatory term while referring to subordinate Indians who spoke English as a second language.

A “Babu” was a person who tried to impress a British master using stylish ornamentation, as the way that he expressed a message was more important than the information relayed.

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