Karnataka Class 10 English Solutions Chapter 10 The Pie and the Tart

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The Pie and the Tart Questions and Answers, Notes, Summary

Comprehension Questions:

I. Answer the following questions briefly

Question 1.
“If I stop walking, I shall freeze”, said Pierre. “I prefer to die sitting down”, said Jean. This shows.
a. that it was extremely cold in Paris on that day
b. that Jean is quick-witted and reacts intelligently
c. their ability to laugh at and talk lightly about their miserable condition.
Answer:
(c) their ability to laugh at and talk lightly about their miserable condition.

Question 2.
Why was Pierre pinched? How did he defend himself before Judge Gaston?
Answer:
Pierre was arrested for begging. He defended himself before the judge saying that he begged because he wanted to live.

Question 3.
“I really don’t see the necessity”, said Judge Gaston. This remark is a reflection on …
a. the judge’s insensitivity
b. how people felt about vagabonds in those days
c. the judge’s sense of humor
Answer:
(a) the judge’s insensitivity

Question 4.
What, according to Pierre, is a sure sign of starvation?
Answer:
Squinting slightly is a sure sign of starvation.

Question 5.
Who opens the door of the cake- shop when Pierre knocks on it?
Answer:
M. Gaultier, the owner of the cake shop, opens the door.

Question 6.
Pick out the common response of Gaultier and Marion to the Vagabond’s begging.
Answer:
Both of them say, “Go away, I’ve got nothing for you.” Gaultier says that his wife is away and he is busy, whereas Marion says that her husband is away and she is busy.

Question 7.
Choose from the box given below the phrases/adjectives that can be used to describe Gaultier. Marion and Pierre.

content with his lot, conceited, hypocritical, foolish A-stoutish, clever, has presence of mind, sensitive, comely, generous, kind, quick-witted, gullible, resourceful, pompous, excellent pastry cook.

Answer:

  • Gaultier: content with his lot, hypocritical, foolish, sensitive, pompous, excellent pastry cook.
  • Marion : conceited, stoutish, comely, gullible.
  • Pierre : clever, has presence of mind, quick-witted, resourceful.

Question 8.
“I can’t very well be seen carrying an eel pie through the streets of Paris. Can I?” says Gaultier. This shows that he is
a) Lazy
b) wise
c) too conscious and proud of his position
Answer:
(c) too conscious and proud of his position.

Question 9.
What details of the conversation between the baker and his wife help Jean in his planning?
Answer:
The baker tells his wife that he would instruct the messenger to kiss his wife’s hand. This helps Jean in his planning.

Question 10.
Why does Jean ask Pierre to get the pie instead of taking it himself?
Answer:
Jean had already knocked once on the door and had already been seen by Marion.

Question 11.
How does the playwright bring out Pierre’s nervousness when he presents himself as the messenger to carry the eel pie?
Answer:
Pierre mixes up the words and says, “Good morning lady. I have come from M. Pie, who sends me to fetch the Gaultier – I should say I have come from M. Gaultier, who sends me to fetch the pie – the eel pie.”

Question 12.
How was Marion going to identify Gaultier’s messenger?
Answer:
The messenger had to ask to kiss Marion’s hand.

Question 13.
Jean does not give the details of the conservation between the baker and his wife to Pierre, as
a) it is not necessary
b) Jean wants to play the boss :
c) Jean wants to take advantage of the situation
Answer:
(c) Jean wants to take advantage of the situation

Question 14.
Pick out any one comparison that Pierre mentions while describing to Marion how he would cany the eel pie?
Answer:
Pierre gives many comparisons. One of them is ‘as a shepherd with his ewes.

Question 15.
Why does Pierre think he was dreaming?
Answer:
Marion handed the pie to Pierce very easily and looking at it, in his extremely hungry state, Pierre thinks he has been dreaming.

Question 16.
Why do the vagabonds go back to the bakery after eating the pie?
Answer:
Pierre tells Jean that when he was waiting at M. Gaultier’s door, he had seen a cranberry tart which he would like to be theirs now. He tells Jean to go and ask Marion for it in the same way that Pierre got the pie.

Question 17.
What makes Pierre say that the eels “give themselves up to Gaultier”? What does it tell you about the baker?
Answer:
Pierre means that Gaultier is such a wonderful baker that even the eels wouldn’t mind dying at his hands if they could only be used in his wonderful pies. Since Pierre mentions that even the tart looked very inviting, we conclude that Gaultier is an excellent baker.

Question 18.
What is the only one fault that Pierre finds with the eel pie?
Answer:
Pierre thinks the only fault with the pie was that there was only one pie and not two.

Question 19.
Who opens the door when Jean goes to get the tart?
Answer:
Marion opens the door.

Question 20.
Does Jean get the tart? What happens to him? Why?
Answer:
No. Jean does not get the tart. M. Gaultier runs out of the shop and starts cudgeling him. Gaultier thinks that it was Jean who had come to take the pie before.

Question 21.
Why did Jean lie to Pierre and send him to fetch the tart?
Answer:
Jean resented the beating he had got at M. Gaultier’s hands, and wanted Pierre to experience the same since he too had eaten the pie with Jean.

Question 22.
What did Jean tell Pierre to convince him that Pierre should go to get the tart?
Answer:
Jean tells that Marion wanted the same messenger who took the pie to take the tart too. He also says that no matter how many times he kissed Marion’s hand, she wouldn’t budge an inch.

Question 23.
Give one example to show that Marion has a good sense of humour.
Answer:
Marion asks Gaultier to choose a good-looking messenger as her hand is not for everyone to kiss.

II. Close Study:

Read the following extracts carefully. Discuss in pairs and then write the answers to the questions given below them:

Question 1.
Pierre: He does not catch them. They give themselves up. No eel could resist the blandishments of such an artist as M. Gaultier.
a) What does ‘them’ refer to?
Answer:
The eels.

b) What does the above statement tell us about Gaultier?
Answer:
It tells us that Gaultier is such a wonderful baker that the eels do not mind dying if they could be included in one of his pies. They voluntarily die so that he could use them in his pie.

c) What prompts Pierre to give such a compliment to Gaultier?
Answer:
Pierre, along with Jean, has just finished eating the pie that Gaultier had baked. That wonder pie, on a starving stomach, prompts him to give such a compliment.

Question 2.
Gaultier: I can’t very well be seen carrying an eel pie through the streets of Paris, can I? … Do you think you could bring it along after me?
a) Where is Gaultier supposed to carry the pie?
Answer:
Gaultier is supposed to carry the pie to the house of the Mayor of Paris.

b) What does the passage tell you about his character?
Answer:
It tells us that Gaultier is very conscious of his position and importance, and thinks too high of himself.

c) Who is he addressing?
Answer:
He is speaking to his wife, Marion.

III. Paragraph Writing.

Discuss in pairs/groups of 4 each the answers to the following questions. Individually, note down the points for
each question and then develop the points into one-paragraph answers.

Question 1.
Jean and Pierre have a lot of similarities. But the dramatist ensures that in spite of their similarities, they are different enough to be individuals.

  • How are Jean and Pierre similar?
  • How are they different? (Answer these sub-questions in a paragraph each).

Answer:

  1. Jean and Pierre are both vagabonds.
  2. Both are shivering in the cold weather.
  3. Both have good sense of humour.
  4. Both are determined to get ‘ something to eat that day.
  5. They do not wallow in self-pity.

Paragraph: Jean and Pierre are the two vagabonds featured in this play. They both have many similarities, mostly in the situations that they are in. They both are poor and are beggars on the streets of Paris. They are dressed similarly in tattered clothes and are cold and hungry. , They both are positive despite their poverty and have a sense of humour. For instance when they share and eat the pie, they praise it in a humorous way and are only too happy to try getting the tart too.

But when it comes to their personalities they differ. Pierre is more energetic, cheerful, humorous and positive of the two of them. Pierre has a restless energy while Jean is more submissive, desolate and even a little sly at times. We see this when it comes to their attitude while battling with the cold weather or even with how they handle the angry Gaultier. Till the end of the play despite differences their humour sustains them and they remain friends.

Question 2.
The lines in italics given after the list of players are called “stage directions”. You find such “stage directions” all through the play. What would happen to the play if these were missing?
Answer:

  1. Plays meant to be enacted.
  2. Stage directions help to stage the play effectively.
  3. Even young, inexperienced people can stage it.
  4. Director can change movements if he wants to.

Paragraph: Stage directions, the descriptive text, are instructions or are part of the script of a play. It tells the actors when to enter or exit from the stage, or to move or what they will speak in their lines. They also provide details about how the playwright has imagined the environment and atmosphere. They describe critical physical aspects of the characters and settings. Stage directions can also be critical in dictating the intended tempo and rhythm of the piece.

IV. Vocabulary Exercises

I. Given below are sets of synonyms (words giving almost the same meaning) One word does not belong to the set. Identify the odd word in. each set.

  1. Absorb, reject, imbibe, assimilate.
  2. Act, deed, performance, trick.
  3. Separate, add, attach, affix.
  4. Order, request, command, instruction.
  5. Climb, mount, fall, ascend
  6. Come, depart, arrive, reach.
  7. Bravery, grit, cowardice, courage.
  8. Adapt, adjust, differ, fit.
  9. Get, lose, obtain, acquire.
  10. Award, grant, confiscate, give.

Answers:

  1. reject
  2. trick
  3. Separate
  4. request
  5. fall
  6. depart
  7. cowardice
  8. differ
  9. lose
  10. confiscate.

V. Language Activities.

A. Humour can be created by what one says (Dialogue), what one does (action) or the situation one is in.
Give one example for each from the play. One example for each is provided for you.
a) Dialogue :
Pierre: It is this blasted cold. If I stop waking I shall freeze. I’m dying of hunger and cold.
Jean: So am I. but I prefer to die sitting down.
Answer:
Pierre: Not bad. But make it seven * days and squint slightly. It’s a sure sign of starvation. ,

b) situation:
Pierre going back to Gaultier’s house . to get the tart without knowing the * trick played by Jean.
Answer:
Gaultier believes Pierre totally when Pierre says that the Mayor has come back and is waiting for him.

c) Action: Pierre attempting to seize Marion’s hand for kissing and Marion snatching it away.
Answer:
Gaultier gives Pierre the tart he desires for and asks him to carry it carefully.

B. Reporting :
Jean overhears the conversation between Gaultier and Marion about taking the eel pie to the Mayor’s house. Report orally the conversation to the class. You can begin like this:
Answer:
Gaultier told Marion that he was about to go to dine with the Mayor. He recalled that he would be taking the big eel pie that he had made the previous Monday. He requested Marion to quickly get the Pie as he wanted to be on time. As she went to get it, he stopped her by saying that it would be beneath him to be seen carrying a pie. Marion said that she had errands to run so she wouldn’t be able to deliver it herself. She suggested that he send someone back for the pie.

C. Dialogue Writing:
Read the following reported speech and write a dialogue based on it.

Gaultier goes to the Mayor’s house. Both greet each other. Mayor inquires how his business was. Gaultier replied that it was fine and that there was a great demand for his eel pies. The Mayor expressed appreciation saying that it was wonderful. Further, he said that he would like to have an eel pie himself. Gaultier remarked that he had sent an eel pie and a cranberry tart with a messenger. The Mayor told him not to play any trick and that he had not received anything. He observed that somebody must have fooled Gaultier.

You can begin like this:

  • The Mayor: (Seated and busy with a file. There’s a knock on the door) Yes.
  • M. Gaultier: May I come in, Sir?
  • The Mayor: (Looking up) Oh! Mr. Gaultier, Please come in.
  • M. Gaultier: Good morning.
  • The Mayor: Good Morning. How’s everything? How’s your business Mr. Gaultier?
  • M. Gaultier: We’re doing fine, there is a great demand for my special eel pie.
  • The Mayor: That is good to hear. I would love to taste your delicious eel pie.
  • M. Gaultier: And you can. I did send an eel pie and a cranberry tart for you with a messenger. Didn’t you get it, Mayor?
  • The Mayor: Do not trick me, Gaultier, I haven’t received any pie or tart. If you have sent it with an unknown messenger, you might have been fooled by him.

VI. Speaking Activity

The words ‘hear’ and ‘here’ are pronounced the same but have different spellings and different meanings. Such words are called “homophones”.

B. Write the homophones of the following words and in pairs read them out to each other.
Answers:

  1. pale – pail
  2. die – dye
  3. pray – prey
  4. sale – sail
  5. blue – blew
  6. meet – meat
  7. all – ale
  8. flu – flew
  9. hail – hale
  10. tear – tier (or tare)
  11. beer – bier
  12. pain – pane
  13. bail – bale
  14. gate – gait
  15. fate – fait
  16. sweet – suite

VII. Grammar Revisited.

C. Passive Voice

Question 1.
Fill in the blanks with a suitable form of verbs given in brackets.
Experiment in Laboratory:
Answer:
The burette is filled (fill) with Potassium Permanganate solution. The initial reading noted (note). The pipette is washed (wash) and then rinsed with ferrous ammonium sulphate solution. 20 ml of ammonium sulphate solution is pipetted (pippet out) into a clear conical flask. An equal volume of 2 normal dilute sulphuric acid is added, (add). The solution titrates (titrate) against the potassium permanganate solution taken in the burette. The end point is the appearance of a pale permanent pink colour. The final burette reading is noted, (note). The titrations are repeated (repeat) for concordant titre values. From the titre value normality of ferrous ammonium sulphate and volume of ferrous ammonium sulphate is known, (know).

Question 2.
Recipe
Answer:
The stove is switched on. Water in a vessel is kept (keep) on the stove for boiling. Meanwhile, coffee powder is put (put) into the coffee filter to get the decoction. The boiled water is poured (pour) into the coffee filter. The milk is boiled (boil) and when the decoction is ready both are mixed (mix) together. To this sugar is added (add) and we have hot coffee ready.

Question 3.
Given below is a set of instructions for the notice board of the school library. Write the instructions using the passive voice.
a) Do not enter without I.D.
Answer:
Students are hereby informed that they will not be allowed to enter the library without I.Ds.

b) Only one book at a time for a period of two weeks.
Answer:
Students are allowed to borrow only one book for a period of two weeks only.

c) Do not borrow works of reference.
Answer:
Works of reference should not be borrowed.

d) Do not underline, mark, write comments in the books.
Answer:
Books should not be underlined or marked, and comments should not be written in them.

e) Speak softly.
Answer:
Soft voices should be used while speaking.

f) Students who fail to return the books in time shall have to pay fine.
Answer:
Fine should be paid by students for books which are not returned in time.

g) Students are responsible for lost- or damaged books.
Answer:
Students will be held responsible for lost or damaged books.

Question 4.
From the data given below, compare the rules in the two schools -Your previous and the present using the verbs – require, advise, permit, allow, encourage, give in their passive forms.

1. The Previous School

  • Speaking English not compulsory. Playing only tennis ball cricket.
  • More freedom.
  • Memorizing facts.
  • Not to be independent.
  • Time for snacks.
  • Treated like kids.
  • Not much homework.

2. The Present school

  • Speaking English on campus compulsory. A wide variety of games.
  • No mixing between boys and girls.
  • To think for ourselves.
  • To be independent.
  • No time for snacks.
  • Treated like grown-ups.
  • A lot of homework.

Answer:
In my previous school, we were not required to speak in English. We were permitted to play only tennis ball cricket. We had more freedom than in the present school. At academics, however, we were not encouraged to be independent but forced to memorize facts. We were treated like kids and there used to be time for snacks. Most importantly, there wasn’t much homework.

In the present school, speaking English on campus has been made compulsory. We are allowed to play a wide variety of games. But, mixing between boys and girls is not permitted. However, academically, we are encouraged to be independent, and to think for ourselves. We are treated like grown-ups and there is no time for snacks. Sadly, we are given a lot of homework.

VIII. Fun With Language. (humor in subtlety)

Read the following pairs of sentences carefully and answer the questions given below them.

Question 1.
a) The judge was completely disinterested.
b) The judge was completely uninterested.
Which of the two is a good judge?
Answer:
a) The judge was completely disinterested.

Question 2.
a) My husband likes beer more than me.
b) My husband likes beer more than me.
Which of the two might be grounds for divorce?
Answer:
b) My husband likes beer more than me.

Question 3.
a) In the theatre, there were 5 people beside me.
b) In the theatre, there were 5 people besides pie.
Which of the two suggests that there were only six people in the theatre?
Answer:
b) In the theatre, there were 5 people besides me.

Question 4.
a) The dog smells bad.
b) The dog smells bad.
Which of the two dogs is definitely not a blood-hound?
Answer:
b) The dog smells badly.

Question 5.
a) No Indian batsman is so great as Sachin.
b) No other Indian batsman is so great as Sachin.
Which of the two suggests that Sachin is not an Indian?
Answer:
a) No Indian batsman is so great as Sachin.

Question 6.
a) Esther is fairly tall for her age.
b) Esther is rather tall for her age.
Which of the two is not a compliment to Esther?
Answer:
b) Esther is rather tall for her age.

Question 7.
a) I saw a black horse and a cow.
b) I saw a black horse and a cow.
Which of the two says that the cow too was black?
Answer:
a) I saw a black horse and a cow.

Question 8.
a) I am going to hospital.
b) I am going to the hospital.
Which of the two suggests that I am not sick?
Answer:
b) I am going to the hospital.

Question 9.
a) I lay on the psychiatrist’s couch for almost an hour.
b) I lied on the psychiatrist’s couch for almost an hour.
Which of the two required imagination?
Answer:
b) I lied on the psychiatrist’s couch for almost an hour.

Question 10.
a) You’ll find the mountain trail easy,
b) You’ll find the mountain trail easily.
Which one assures you of an easy climb.
Answer:
a) You’ll find the mountain trail easy.

Question 11.
a) No other leader of India was as great as Gandhi.
b) No other leader of India was greater than Gandhi.
Which of the two says that Gandhi was the greatest leader of India?
Answer:
b) No other leader of India was greater than Gandhi.

Question 12.
a) He will get better.
b) He is going to get better.
Which of the two implies that there are signs of recovery?
Answer:
b) He is going to get better.

Question 13.
None but a fool would say this. This sentence means,
a) No fool would say this.
b) Only a fool would say this.
Answer:
b) Only a fool would say this.

Question 14.
Is not virtue its own reward? This sentence means
a) Virtue is its own reward.
b) Virtue is not its own reward.
Answer:
a) Virtue is its own reward.

Question 15.
Oh, that I was a bird!. This sentence means
a) I hope I were a bird.
b) I wish I were a bird.
Answer:
b) I wish I were a bird.

The Pie and the Tart Summary in English

Characters of the Play:
Pierre, Jean} vagabonds,
Gaultier – a pastry cook
Marion – his wife.

This play has the story of two vagabonds cunningly taking away a pie and a tart from a baker, and managing to survive that day. It is the characters of these vagabonds that is very interesting in the play. They are street-smart, witty, practical, shrewd and quick in their thinking and actions.

KSEEB SSLC Class 10 English Solutions Chapter 10 The Pie and the Tart

Jean and Pierre are two vagabonds starving and shivering in the cold wind.

When Pierre has gone to beg, Jean overhears the baker Gaultier, mentioning an eel pie which he wanted someone to take to the mayor.

After the baker goes away, Jean asks Pierre to go and ask for the pie in the manner Gaultier had mentioned.

He gets the pie and both of them eat it happily. Then they want the tart Pierre had seen on the shelf in Gaultier’s house.

Jean goes to ask for it and gets beaten up by Gaultier. He utters a lie and comes back to Pierre.

He sends Pierre who is also threatened with beatings, but very cleverly utters a lie and manages to take the tart

Both of them eat the tart happily.

The Pie and the Tart Summary in Kannada

The Pie and the Tart Summary in Kannada 1
The Pie and the Tart Summary in Kannada 2

KSEEB SSLC Class 10 English Solutions

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